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Japan urges 15% electricity saving

posted May 20, 2012, 1:06 PM by ema-1 ema-1   [ updated May 20, 2012, 1:16 PM ]
"Japan's government is urging businesses and households to cut their electricity use by up to 15%. Japan is facing power shortages because all its 50 nuclear reactors have been taken offline in the wake of the Fukushima nuclear disaster. Public confidence in the nuclear industry has been shaken by the meltdowns at Fukushima, triggered by last year's massive earthquake and tsunami"

"Before the Fukushima meltdowns, nuclear energy powered up to 30% of the country's electricity"


Japan plans solar FIT tarrif 

"This month, a proposal drafted by Japan's Economy, Trade and Industry Ministry earmarked 42 yen (67c) per kWh as the rate utilities will have to pay to buy solar-generated power - a rate twice as high as consumers currently pay for electricity.

The tariff scheme is the legacy of former Prime Minister Naoto Kan, who led the country during the March 11 crisis last year, and pushing the bill through Parliament was one of his final acts before resigning in August.

Feed-in tariff polices - which have been enacted in more than 50 countries - are a way for governments to push clean energy by forcing electrical utilities to buy it at higher than market rates"

Full story: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/world/news/article.cfm?c_id=2&objectid=10805280

Japan - green energy on the horizon

"To offset the shortfall, utilities have ramped up oil- and gas-based generation, giving resource-poor Japan, the world's third-largest economy, its biggest annual trade deficit ever last fiscal year. That $100 million-plus a day extra cost, worries over the risks of nuclear power and concern over carbon emissions are leading many decisionmakers to view renewable energy such as solar, hydro and wind more positively"


Japan is one of New Zealand's largest trading partners with an import export value totaling over NZ$6 billion. Total Japanese investment in New Zealand is over NZ$6 billion. New Zealand investment in Japan totals over NZ$3 billion.
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